EMSL Analytical, Inc.
Purchase Kit Now!
FAQ's
Downloads
 
 
Resources
 
Results
Contact Us
200 Route 130 North
Cinnaminson, NJ 08077

1-800-220-3675

Radon Testing Lab
Real Estate Homeowners Schools and Large Buildings

Interpreting Results


The average indoor radon level is estimated to be about 1.3 pCi/L; roughly 0.4 pCi/L of radon is normally found in the outside air. The U.S. Congress has set a long-term goal that indoor radon levels be no more than outdoor levels. While this goal is not yet technologically achievable for all homes, radon levels in many homes can be reduced to 2 pCi/L or below.

Radon Test Results Reported in Two Ways


Your radon test results may be reported in either picoCuries per liter of air (pCi/L) or working levels (WL).

If your test result is in pCi/L, EPA recommends you fix your home if your radon level is 4 pCi/L or higher.

If the test result is in WL, EPA recommends you fix the home if the working level is 0.02 WL or higher. 

Some states require WL results to be converted to pCi/L to minimize confusion.

EPA recommends fixing your home if the results from one long-term test or the average of two short-term tests show radon levels of 4 pCi/L (or 0.02 WL) or higher. Sometimes short-term tests are less definitive about whether the home is at or above 4 pCi/L; particularly when the results are close to 4 pCi/L. For example, if the average of two short-term tests is 4.1 pCi/L, there is about a 50% chance that the year-round average is somewhat below 4 pCi/L. 

However, EPA believes that any radon exposure carries some risk; no level of radon is safe. Even radon levels below 4 pCi/L pose some risk.  You can reduce your risk of lung cancer by lowering your radon level.

As with other environmental pollutants, there is some uncertainty about the magnitude of radon health risks. However, we know more about radon risks than risks from most other cancer-causing substances. This is because estimates of radon risks are based on data from human studies (underground miners). Additional studies on more typical populations are under way.

Your radon measurement will give you an idea of your risk of getting lung cancer from radon. Your chances of getting lung cancer from radon depend mostly on:
  • Your home's radon level;
  • The amount of time you spend in your home; and
  • Whether you are a smoker or have ever smoked.

Smoking combined with radon is an especially serious health risk. If you smoke or are a former smoker, the presence of radon greatly increases your risk of lung cancer. If you stop smoking now and lower the radon level in your house, you will reduce your lung cancer risk.
2011 EMSL Analytical, Inc.